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Posts from the ‘Rights Management’ Category

UCLA Digital Library Program

This paper explores the principles that underpin the the digital library program at UCLA, examples of collections being digitized, and the partnerships being developed to enhance the digital library collections, including discussion of the collaborative nature of creating metadata, joint projects, and collaborative agreements.


After Digitization, What’s Next?

Rita Wong, Deputy Librarian and Head of Information Technology & Planning, The Chinese University of Hong Kong The paper will briefly describe digitization projects in Hong Kong. More in-depth description and problems encountered at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK)will be discussed. At CUHK, not only paper and microform formats, but also audio and […]


Mass digitization of the collections of the academic libraries in China

China-US Million Book Digital Library Project, also called CADAL, is a cooperated mass digitization project of universities and institutes in China and USA. The CADAL Project has scanned 1.43 million books and other items, mainly from the collections of 16 well-known academic libraries in China, funded by the Ministry of Education of China (MOE). Zhejiang University Libraries has organized and led the digitization process. This presentation reveals the progress in and issues of the mass digitization project, such as the content selection, technology for scanning, OCR, metadata, copyright and access to the digital products.


polo outlet

The broad topic of the paper is digital and intellectual property rights management and the open access movement. These will have an enormous impact on the dissemination of very current research at costs far below those charged by commercial publishers, in some cases at no charge. This reformation of scholarly communication processes will allow very rapid advancement of developing nations, and may bring beneficial as well as detrimental change to those nations and the rest of the world. My approach will be from the perspective of a librarian with a doctoral degree in cultural anthropology.